More Entitlements Articles

  • With health law, workers ponder the I-Quit option

    CHICAGO — For uninsured people, the nation's new health care law may offer an escape from worry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job. At 62,...

  • Massachusetts minimum wage bill hits delay at Statehouse

    BOSTON — Efforts to raise the state's minimum wage have hit a snag. On Thursday, a House committee had been expected to formally unveil a bill that would increase the hourly wage from $8 to $10.50 over three years while overhauling the state's unemployment insurance system. Instead, the...

  • Applications for U.S. unemployment aid rose slightly

    The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits rose 5,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 320,000, which is close to pre-recession levels and suggests a stable job market. The four-week average of applications, a less volatile figure, fell 3,500 to 327,000, the lowest since late...

  • Veterans' unemployment edges down but still high

    New Labor Department figures show the unemployment rate for working-age veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. armed forces since September 2001 edged down slightly in 2013, to 9.0 percent. But Thursday's report also found that the rate remained well above the overall civilian...

  • State officials rail against Senate plan to extend unemployment benefits

    State officials say a Senate proposal to restore unemployment insurance benefits to more than 2 million long-term jobless would do more harm than good, warning that some states may ignore the legislation if it's passed into law. The National Association of State Workforce Agencies, in a letter...

  • In-state tuition bill survives close Florida Senate vote

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — An effort to allow qualified Florida students to pay in-state college tuition rates even if they are in the country illegally is deeply dividing the Republican-controlled Legislature. A Senate committee on Tuesday barely approved the legislation (SB 1400) after four GOP...

  • Massachusetts moves to head off food stamps cuts

    BOSTON — Massachusetts joined several other states Tuesday in moving to preserve food assistance benefits for households that would otherwise be reduced under a recently approved federal farm bill. The actions by the states recently prompted U.S. House Speaker John Boehner to accuse state...

  • Wisconsin gubernatorial hopeful would cut school vouchers

    MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke said Tuesday that the state should not have expanded the private school voucher program statewide or created a new private school tax deduction. Calling the tax breaks and voucher spending "a new entitlement program that...

  • States looking at $0 community college tuition

    Nothing sparks consumer demand like the word "free," and politicians in some states have proposed the idea of providing that incentive to get young people to attend community college.

  • Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy raps John Boehner over food stamp criticism

    Gov. Dannel P. Malloy struck back Monday against U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, saying it was reprehensible to accuse Connecticut and other states of cheating the federal food stamp program by approving nominal increases in home heating assistance.

  • Washington food program includes college training

    The welding shop in Skagit Valley College's Reeves Hall is a far cry from the prison cell Kevin Riley spent about five years in until his January 2012 release. Now, Riley is on the cusp of getting his associate's degree in welding technology, with other certifications to boot.

  • Amy Chua's latest is a tiger of a book

    Professor Amy Chua of the Yale law school is better known as a "Tiger Mom" because of her take-no-prisoners tough love approach to raising children. She and her husband Jed Rubenfeld (a fellow Yale law professor) have written what may turn out to be the best book of this year.

  • Oscar winner to promote breakfast for schoolchildren in Arkansas

    An Oscar-winning actor and the head of a national relief agency are scheduled to visit Arkansas on Monday to talk about the importance of breakfast among school children whose hunger distracts them while they are also trying to learn.

  • K-12 students receiving free breakfast on the rise in the U.S.

    Washington, D.C., is seeing a rapid growth in the number of K-12 students eating a free breakfast at school. In the District, the rate went up by 72 percent between 2009 to 2013, from 20,431 participating students to 35,038. Compared to all 50 states, D.C. saw the fastest growth. The number of...

  • Veteran retirements highlight how much Congress has made itself powerless

    Stay in any job for six decades and you’re bound to be a bit jaded when you finally retire. “I find serving in the House to be obnoxious,” Rep. John Dingell recently told the Detroit News. “It's become very hard because of the acrimony and bitterness, both in Congress and in the...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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