More Facebook Articles

  • OKCupid, Facebook not alone in studying consumers

    NEW YORK (AP) — Think you're in control? Think again. This week, OKCupid became the latest company to admit that it has manipulated customer data to see how users of its dating service would react to one another. The New York-based Internet company's revelation follows news earlier this month...

  • Facebook says calling for death to Israel isn't hate speech because it's a country

    "Language attacking a country is not considered hate speech in our community standards," Matt Steinfeld, a spokesman for Facebook, wrote in an email.

  • Facebook says page calling for death to Jews doesn't violate 'community standards'

    A Facebook page calling for the death of Israeli Jews does not violate the social network's "community standards," according to multiple messages sent by Facebook in response to user complaints.

  • US companies increasingly fish for growth overseas

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Major U.S. companies are starting to reap their most rapid growth in fertile lands of opportunity far from home. Technology trendsetters Apple Inc., Google Inc., Facebook Inc. and Netflix Inc. all mined foreign countries to produce earnings or revenue that exceeded...

  • Facebook has more users than the nation's 1,300 newspapers combined

    Facebook attracts more visits than the country's 1,300 newspapers and the social network's users stay connected for nearly 30 minutes, nearly 10-times longer than they do on a news site.

  • Facebook tests 'Buy' button

    NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook is testing a "Buy" button in its latest effort to help businesses boost their sales through the world's biggest online social network. The company said in a statement Thursday that the button will let people buy products directly from businesses without leaving...

  • What happens to your online accounts when you die?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — You've probably decided who gets the house or that family heirloom up in the attic when you die. But what about your email account and all those photos stored online? Grieving relatives might want access for sentimental reasons, or to settle financial issues. But do you want...

  • Facebook tip leads to arrest in hit-and-run crash

    ISCHUA, N.Y. (AP) — Authorities say a tip called in by a Facebook follower led to the arrest of the motorist who was involved in a hit-and-run accident with an Amish horse-drawn buggy on a western New York road. State police say they posted information on the July 7 crash in Cattaraugus...

  • Iranian court sentences Facebook activists to jail

    TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — TEHRAN, Iran (AP) —An Iranian court handed jail sentences of eight to 21 years to eight Facebook page administrators, the official IRNA news agency reported on Sunday. The report said the defendants were convicted of plotting against national security, spreading...

  • Maine police get Facebook boost with stuffed duck

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Police here believe they have quacked the code for finding followers on social media. The 80-officer Bangor Police Department, which serves a city of about 33,000, has attracted more than 20,000 likes on its Facebook page after humorous pictures of a stuffed duck were...

  • 'Ban Bossy' creator brings her special brand of feminism to India

    Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer and the force behind the “Ban Bossy” campaign, is now educating women in India how to be leaders.

  • Journal expresses 'concern' over Facebook study

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The scientific journal that published a study by Facebook and two U.S. universities examining people's online mood swings regrets how the social experiment was handled. In a note of contrition, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the...

  • UK opens probe into Facebook's psych experiment

    LONDON (AP) — British regulators are investigating revelations that Facebook treated hordes of its users like laboratory rats in an experiment probing into their emotions. The Information Commissioner's Office said Wednesday that it wants to learn more about the circumstances underlying a...

  • The reason the U.S. government is investing huge money in social media

    Social media's rise in popularity is being accompanied by a rise in federal spending on it.

  • Brian Schweitzer apologized on Facebook for his remarks and the comments are insane

    Former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer apologized on Facebook for his offensive comments about House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and the commenters on the post are ridiculous. "I recently made a number of stupid and insensitive remarks to a reporter from the...



From the Weekly Standard