More Finance and Banking Articles

  • How the CFPB is trying to mimic Yelp

    The government's consumer finance regulatory agency is seeking to create a new source of aggravation for banks: Consumer testimonials and reviews of financial services.

  • Mark Zandi: The go-to economist when fiscal war breaks out

    By defining the center of economic opinion on a range of topics from mortgages to health care, Mark Zandi has made himself a valuable authority. The leaders of both parties love to cite him -- when his analysis helps their cause.

  • If you've got a small business, odds are the Export-Import Bank isn't helping you

    Americans now know the Export-Import Bank is a corporatist program built on bad economics.

  • Janet Yellen stumbled over these two bailout questions

    She avoided making any big monetary policy news in two appearances on Capitol Hill this week, but Janet Yellen couldn't escape a few confrontations that raise doubts about the details of the Federal Reserve's plans to avoid bailouts in future financial crises.

  • Elizabeth Warren grills Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen on crucial too-big-to-fail question

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren grilled Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen on an important provision of the law intended to prevent banks from becoming too big to fail.

  • EXography: Wall Street migrates south to low-cost Southern cities

    When we think about American finance, the default Image is of a pinstriped banker on Wall Street. But increasingly, the financial services sector, which employs eight million people, is shifting away from the traditional bastions of money.

  • In first public speech, new Federal Reserve vice chairman dismisses breaking up big banks

    Stanley Fischer warned that "actively breaking up the largest banks would be a very complex task, with uncertain payoff," even though some critics say more regulation is needed in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. 

  • Bank of England leaves interest rates steady

    LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has kept interest rates steady at a record low of 0.5 percent and refrained from pumping more money into the economy even as the recovery gathers strength. Thursday's decision was widely expected, even after Bank of England Governor Mark Carney startled...

  • French financier to head Vatican bank

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Vatican has chosen a French financier to become the new president of its bank, which is overhauling the way it operates after a series of financial scandals. As widely expected, the Vatican announced Wednesday it had tapped Jean-Baptiste de Franssu to head the...

  • Most households still not borrowing

    Six years out from the financial crisis, most Americans are still not borrowing more, despite well-qualified borrowers taking out loans.

  • Bulgarians arrested after 'plot' against banks

    SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) — Two brokers have been charged with plotting to undermine Bulgaria's top banks by spreading rumors of their instability, triggering runs on deposits and forcing the government to step in with rescue aid. Police arrested five people on Sunday for allegedly sending...

  • Stocks head lower on Wall Street, led by banks

    NEW YORK (AP) — Banks and other financial firms tugged the stock market slightly lower Thursday as a mixed batch of economic reports and earnings results gave investors little reason to push the market up. Barclays sank following news that New York's attorney general sued the British bank,...

  • Average US 30-year mortgage rate falls to 4.14 pct

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Average U.S. rates on fixed mortgages declined this week, hovering near historically low levels. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year loan eased to 4.14 percent from 4.17 percent last week. The average for the 15-year mortgage fell to...

  • Amidst crisis, CFPB quietly offers legal services to worried managers

    Several weeks after a top whistleblower testified of widespread discrimination and retaliation at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, agency officials quietly moved to reimburse its managers for legal counsel and offer legal protections, the Washington Examiner has learned. The new CFPB...

  • Say it ain't so, Joe: Biden claims he has no savings account, owns no stock (but his salary and benefits are pretty good!)

    Vice President Joe Biden said Monday he empathizes with the plight of working families, adding in a speech at the White House that he has no savings accounts and owns no stock.



From the Weekly Standard