Share

More Finance and Banking Articles

  • Former senators to lobby for Russian bank

    Former GOP Senate leader Trent Lott and former Democratic Senator John Breaux are lobbying for a Russian bank sanctioned by President Obama.

  • House Republicans question Jack Lew over 'too big to fail'

    Rep. Scott Garrett, chairman of the capital markets subcommittee of the House Financial Services Committee, wrote a letter to Lew Tuesday with six other Republicans warning that the council's treatment of insurers "has led to uncertainty in the insurance industry and raised concern that the...

  • Some fear auto industry returning to bad habits

    DETROIT (AP) — Big discounts. Six- or seven-year loans, in some cases to buyers who would have been turned down in the past. As the auto industry strives to sustain its post-recession comeback, car companies are resorting to tactics that some experts warn will lead to trouble down the road....

  • MetLife in the dark as 'too big to fail' label looms

    For more than a year, a regulatory super-group has investigated whether MetLife poses a systemic risk to the financial system if it fails, the way that insurer AIG did in the 2008 crisis.

  • 'Too big to fail' could be slapped on more non-banks

    It is widely expected that the Sept. 4 meeting announced by the Financial Stability Oversight Council late Thursday will focus on applying the label of "too big to fail" to one insurer, MetLife.

  • Burger King makes move to Canada official

    Talk of the move has drawn criticism from Democratic lawmakers who are concerned about U.S. companies using mergers with companies in lower-tax jurisdictions to lower their U.S. tax payments.

  • WEX BackStory: Janet Yellen's trillion-dollar question

    Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen's speech Friday at an annual summit of central bank leaders paints a picture of what to expect in the coming months.

  • VIDEO: Justice Department, Bank of America reach $17 billion settlement

    The Department of Justice on Thursday announced that Bank of America will pay a $16.65 billion fine to settle allegations it sold risky mortgage-backed securities before the 2008 financial crisis.

  • Revolving door at regulator CFPB enables former bureaucrats to cash in at taxpayers' expense

    Congress thought it was time to replace "captured" financial regulators with a new, un-captured regulator. But that's not what the CFPB turned out to be.



From the Weekly Standard