More Law Articles

  • Court filing says ship in Texas spill was speeding

    HOUSTON (AP) — The owner of a tugboat that collided with a ship last month, dumping nearly 170,000 gallons of oil into the Houston Ship Channel, claims in court filings the ship was speeding and being operated in a reckless manner. Houston-based Kirby Inland Marine alleges in court documents...

  • Google, Apple settle high-tech workers' lawsuit

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe Systems have settled a class-action lawsuit alleging they conspired to prevent their engineers and other highly sought technology workers from getting better job offers from one another. The agreement announced Thursday averts a Silicon...

  • Ruling: Right to jury trial in shoplifting cases

    PHOENIX (AP) — A state appellate court cited 17th century English court cases Thursday in a ruling that expands Arizonans' right to have a jury trial in misdemeanor cases by saying additional shoplifting defendants are entitled to be judged by their peers instead of a judge. The Court of...

  • A supreme need for educational diversity

    In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ended legal segregation in public schools with a unanimous 9-0 decision in Brown v. Board of Education. While the ruling paved the way for future integration of American society, the court itself was far from integrated. The decision was reached by nine white men....

  • Senate Republicans warn that Obama deportation review will lead to weakened enforcement

    In an April 24 letter to President Obama, nearly two dozen Senate Republicans express concern that the purpose of the Homeland Security's “enforcement review” is to loosen the standards for deporting illegal immigrants and weaken border security.

  • FCC Internet fairness policy seen eroded in pay-for-access plan

    A U.S. regulatory proposal that would let Internet-service providers charge companies for content distribution has set off a firestorm of opposition, with consumer advocates saying it may doom the open Internet. Internet-service providers such as AT&T Inc. would be able to negotiate...

  • Initiative seeks to legalize pot in Nevada

    CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — A pro-marijuana group hoping to ride a wave of mounting acceptance for cannabis filed an initiative petition Wednesday seeking to legalize recreational pot use in Nevada. The measure backed by a group called Campaign to Regulate Marijuana would allow adults 21 and...

  • US weighs clemency for inmates jailed for 10 years

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is encouraging many nonviolent federal prisoners to apply for early release — and expecting thousands to take up the offer. It's an effort to deal with high costs and overcrowding in prisons, and also a matter of fairness, the government says. On...

  • Singer Chris Brown's DC trial delayed for months

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Singer Chris Brown's trial on an assault charge was put on hold for months Wednesday after prosecutors declined to grant immunity to his bodyguard, who would be a key witness in the case. Brown will remain in custody for the near future after a Los Angeles judge denied a...

  • Tentative deal reached in TSA breast-milk lawsuit

    PHOENIX (AP) — A Southern California woman who was held at a Phoenix airport four years ago after refusing to have her breast milk X-rayed said Wednesday she has reached a tentative settlement with the Transportation Security Administration. Stacey Armato, who filed a lawsuit in U.S. District...

  • High court nixes $3.4M award to child porn victim

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a plea to make it easier for victims of child pornography to collect money from people who view their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the...

  • Lawyer: US man held in Cuba seeks to go home soon

    HAVANA (AP) — The lawyer for U.S. government subcontractor Alan Gross, who has been imprisoned for more than four years in Cuba, said Wednesday his client is certain he will go home in the next year, be it alive or dead. Speaking to reporters in Havana after visiting Gross, attorney Scott...

  • Democracy, the Supreme Court and affirmative action

    The question of racial preferences in university admissions has bedeviled the nation for decades. In 2003, the Supreme Court finally issued a verdict that gave something to either side of the debate.

  • Judge dismisses case against Blackwater defendant

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday dismissed criminal charges against a former Blackwater security guard whose actions allegedly triggered the shootings of dozens of Iraqi citizens at a traffic circle in Baghdad nearly seven years ago. U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth dismissed...

  • Court upholds NC gang member's death sentence

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A federal appeals court has upheld a gang member's death sentence for killing two brothers at a North Carolina restaurant. A divided three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond on Wednesday rejected several claims by Alejandro Enrique Ramirez...



From the Weekly Standard

  • The Closing of the Academic Mind

    From Brandeis on the Atlantic to Azusa on the Pacific, an iron curtain has descended across academia. Behind that line lie all the classrooms of the ancient schools of America. Wesleyan, Brown,...

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  • Why Not an Open Convention?

    When the Republican National Committee adopted a new primary calendar in January, few people fully thought through the impact. Successfully and necessarily fighting the last war, Chairman Reince...

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  • NATO Is Still the Answer

    The continuing Ukraine crisis raises both a critical “what if?” question and a pressing policy issue. What if, in April 2008, the Europeans had not rejected President Bush’s proposal to...

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