More Magazine Articles

  • EPA's shredding system makes bad news about climate regulations disappear

    Federal law mandates an independent scientific review of the possible effects -- both good and bad -- of proposed environmental regulations before decisionmakers act. The Environmental Protection Agency doesn't do that. The scofflaw EPA routinely and systematically kills any hint of bad...

  • Democrats have only themselves to blame for the failure of Obamacare

    Since the start of the year, when it at last became clear that an ill-designed website was merely the least of Obamacare's problems, Democrats have been on a search for a plausible villain on whom this sad state of affairs can be blamed.

  • GOP finds unwinding Obamacare vexing now that it's taken root

    Republicans are still determined to repeal Obamacare, even though they have famously failed to unite behind an alternative. Now, it is dawning on some in the GOP that even if they succeed in repealing the Affordable Care Act, and even if they pass an alternative, they will still have to come up...

  • Examiner Editorial: Desperate about Keystone XL? Throw mud at the Kochs

    Controversy erupted last week when Steven Mufson and Juliet Eilperin of the Washington Post's Wonkblog posted a story headlined, “The biggest lease holder in Canada's oil sands isn't Exxon Mobil or Chevron. It's the Koch Brothers.” According to Mufson and Eilperin, the Koch Brother's...

  • A former insane asylum is a fitting place for the mess that is Homeland Security

    It's “a boondoggle of epic proportions,” an exasperated Rep. Richard Hudson, R-N.C., told Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson at a recent congressional hearing, “if you're in the middle of a huge mess, you stop digging.” The specific object of Hudson's ire was...

  • Fred Phelps was the prophet of a counterfeit religion

    My parents taught me never to speak ill of the dead, but in the case of Fred Phelps, who died last week at 84, I think they would have made an exception. The man, who will be referred to in this column without the modifier “reverend” because there was nothing reverent about him, defined...

  • Examiner Editorial: Russia, China navies grow as U.S. swabbies tally traffic tickets

    It was just a few weeks ago that Russian defense minister Sergei Shoigu announced, according to The Guardian, that his country “planned to increase its military projection abroad, including in Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua.” The next day, Russia's Viktor Leonov docked in Havana. The Guardian...

  • Will any 2016 Republican hopeful stand up for a strong defense?

    If one or more of the would-be 2016 GOP nominees steps forward soon with a detailed plan on how to reshape and fund the Defense Department from 2017 through 2020, he or she will instantly achieve a significant advantage in the race for the Republican nomination. There is simply no established...

  • Obama struggles to contain fallout from Ukraine crisis

    Russia's swift annexation of Crimea created ripple effects that extend well beyond Ukraine, fundamentally redefining the relationship between Washington and Moscow. Vladimir Putin's land grab undermined President Obama's so-called "reset" with Russia, leaving the White House appearing weak and...

  • Is Jeanne Shaheen unstoppable?

    Jeanne Shaheen's Senate seat should have been safe. Shaheen, a New Hampshire Democrat up for re-election this year, is a former governor who is rated favorably by more than half of her state's residents -- quite a feat for any Democrat in a year when the president and his signature health care...

  • Scott Brown in New Hampshire: Carpetbagger or Comeback Kid?

    Former Massachussets Gov. Scott Brown is hoping to win the Republican nod to run against New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen in this fall's midterm elections to represent the state as its as its senator. But first Brown must first pass a geography test of sorts: Is he New Hampshire enough?

  • Souped-up ground game could be GOP's key to winning Senate

    If Republicans win control of the Senate in November, they could owe their victory to a bunch of computer geeks and data nerds holed up in two offices 2,800 miles apart. The Republicans need to flip six seats to wrest the Senate majority from the Democrats on a playing field that is expanding...

  • Supreme Court set to hear Obamacare contraception case

    The Supreme Court is set to address whether businesses can opt out of Obamacare because of religious objections, in a new challenge that addresses the constitutionality of the president's health care law. The case also amps up the debate of whether corporations are "people" with the same...

  • White House stiffs futures watchdog

    The regulators charged with carrying out a key provision of the Dodd-Frank financial reform law are warning that they don't have enough funding to do the job, but neither the Obama administration nor Washington seems to be listening. Like other federal agencies, the Commodity Futures Trade...

  • Senate Democrats have record fundraising month

    The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee posted another record fundraising month, bringing in $6.8 million in February and raising its total for the election cycle to $66 million. After its best February haul ever, the campaign arm set up to defend Democratic candidates for Senate has...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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