More Media Articles

  • Washington Post, Guardian win Pulitzers for NSA revelations

    The Washington Post and The Guardian won the Pulitzer Prize in public service Monday for revealing the U.S. government's sweeping surveillance efforts in stories based on thousands of secret documents handed over by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

  • Ex-editor Coulson: Affair with Brooks was 'wrong'

    LONDON (AP) — Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson took the stand at Britain's phone hacking trial Monday, saying his affair with fellow executive Rebekah Brooks was wrong but didn't lead him to share work secrets with her. Coulson, who is on trial alongside Brooks and five others,...

  • British journalist Patrick Seale dies at 84

    BEIRUT (AP) — Patrick Seale, a veteran journalist and author on Middle Eastern affairs as well as one of the world's leading historians on Syria, has died in London after a battle with cancer, according to family and friends. He was 83. An accomplished reporter, writer and literary agent,...

  • It's time for Congress to hit the 'reset' button on public diplomacy

    George Kennan knew a thing or two about how nations treat one another. In 1946, while serving as deputy chief of the U.S. mission in Moscow, he penned "the long telegram." That assessment of what motivated the Soviet Union shaped U.S. policy toward Moscow for decades.

  • Rep. Elijah Cummings to appear on CBS' 'Face the Nation' Sunday

    The Maryland congressman has been under fire from Republican Rep. Darrell Issa over his handling of the IRS targeting scandal.

  • Media Matters writer cries sexism over column critical of Hillary Clinton

    Apparently, it's sexist to write about former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's lack of accomplishment, and it's even more sexist to suggest that she has to rely on husband Bill and President Obama to sell her candidacy, according to Media Matters writer Eric Boehlert. Boehlert played the...

  • US Internet ad revenue surpasses broadcast

    NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time, U.S. Internet advertising revenue has surpassed that of broadcast television thanks to sharp growth in mobile and digital video ads. That's according to a report from the Interactive Advertising Bureau, which said Thursday that Internet advertising revenue...

  • Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras returning to the U.S. for the first time since Edward Snowden leaks

    Journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras will return to the U.S. on Friday, the first time they've been back since the Edward Snowden revelations. The Huffington Post reported Thursday that the two are returning to New York City to attend Friday's Polk Awards ceremony. They are sharing...

  • Remembering Chuck Stone's courage as a pundit and as a man

    Black journalist Chuck Stone was one of those people whose passing makes us think, "We shall not see his like again." He was passionately interested in racial issues but he was never a race hustler. He followed nobody's party line but called the issues as he saw them. Chuck Stone was a...

  • The New York Times has an Israel problem

    From within the newspaper’s Manhattan offices, for example, Times staffers can see a billboard across the street that asks, “Would a great newspaper slant the news against Israel? The New York Times does.”

  • AP photographer killed, reporter wounded

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — An Afghan police commander opened fire Friday on two Associated Press journalists, killing Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounding veteran correspondent Kathy Gannon — the first known case of a security insider attacking journalists in...

  • Salon 'makes sense' of Fort Hood shooting with the 'crazy veteran' stereotype

    It was only a matter of time after the deadly shootings Wednesday at Fort Hood, Texas, before some media outlet would roll out the now-tired stereotype of the war-damaged, crazed veteran. In this case, it was Salon, which published a piece by Natasha Lennard purporting to "make sense" of the...

  • Bill Pepper, longtime foreign correspondent, dies

    MILAN (AP) — Curtis Bill Pepper, a long-time foreign correspondent for Newsweek and author of eight books, has died in Italy at the age of 96. Pepper's widow, the American sculptor Beverly Pepper, said he died early Friday at home in the Umbrian town of Todi. Pepper, known as Bill, was a...

  • NJ's largest paper, Star-Ledger, cuts 40 news jobs

    NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey's largest newspaper is cutting about 170 jobs, including 25 percent of its newsroom positions, as it moves to consolidate operations and cut costs. The Star-Ledger reported Thursday on NJ.com that the cuts will mean the loss of 40 of the 156 newsroom staffers at...

  • 'Honor Diaries' is about the real war on women, not 'Islamophobia'

    Despite what organizations like the Council on American-Islamic Relations say, the film "Honor Diaries" is about the abuses that women face around the world. In an interview with the Washington Examiner, human rights attorney Paula Kweskin, a writer and producer for the film, said it was clear...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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  • Mitch McConnell, Judicial Activist

    "This is the best Supreme Court, if you’re interested in a free society and in the ability of Americans to participate in the political process with a minimum amount of government restrictions....

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