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More Poverty Articles

  • Senators: Spike in energy costs could push 840,000 Americans into poverty

    Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Tim Scott of South Carolina released their report on energy insecurity to highlight some of the repercussions from regulations that they say could raise energy costs.

  • Poverty fell in 2013, but incomes haven't recovered from the recession

    The share of Americans officially living in poverty in 2013 was 14.5 percent, down from 15 percent in 2012.

  • UN chief: Climate summit will 'lay the framework' for carbon price

    Ban Ki-moon said the meeting of more than 120 heads of states in New York will also "promote innovative financing mechanisms" to move beyond investments in fossil fuels, and that it would seek to make the "case for removing policy ambiguity" in hopes of pushing nations toward cleaner energy sources.

  • Alaska, West Coast lead U.S. in receiving welfare

    The Census Bureau reported Tuesday that almost 7 percent of people in the Frontier State receive public assistance from the federal or state government, more than a percentage point more than the state with the next highest rate.

  • Blacks must confront reality

    How much of what we see today can be explained by racial discrimination? To begin to get a handle on the answer, let's pull up a few historical facts about black Americans.

  • We can avoid more Fergusons

    Change has swept our nation over the years. Technologies abound that no one would have dreamed of. And millions of black Americans have moved into the ranks of the upper middle class, the rich and the super rich.

  • EXography: Senator lives like a Rockefeller but bills the cost to taxpayers

    West Virginia's Jay Rockefeller comes from one of America's wealthiest families and represents one of its poorest states, yet he travels home almost exclusively via private charter plane at $4,400 per trip and sends the bill to taxpayers.

  • Ferguson shows that blacks live in a different America

    The country still resembles what a presidential commission described in 1968: "two societies, one black, one white -- separate and unequal."



From the Weekly Standard