More Privacy Articles

  • Edward Snowden defends question to Vladimir Putin

    In an op-ed published in The Guardian, Snowden said that he intended to hold Putin accountable for Russia's surveillance policies and get him on the record.

  • White House updating online privacy policy

    A new Obama administration privacy policy released Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites, and it clarifies that online comments, whether tirades or tributes, are in the open domain. "Information you...

  • Michaels confirms breach of as many as 2.6M cards

    NEW YORK (AP) — Michaels Stores Inc. said Thursday that about 2.6 million cards, or about 7 percent of all debit and credit cards used at its namesake stores, may have been affected in a security breach. The nation's largest arts and crafts chain said its subsidiary Aaron Brothers was also...

  • Police charge Canadian in Internet privacy breach

    OTTAWA, Ontario (AP) — Police have charged a 19-year-old Canadian man in connection with the loss of taxpayer data from Canada's tax agency website. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said Wednesday that Stephen Arthuro Solis-Reyes was arrested at his residence Tuesday and is charged with...

  • Obama administration denies knowing about Heartbleed before this month

    The Obama administration is denying that the National Security Agency or any other part of the government knew about a flaw in the way that many websites send sensitive information, known as the Heartbleed bug, before it was discovered earlier this month. “Reports that NSA or any other part...

  • Obama 'confident' NSA changes will safeguard privacy, security

    President Obama on Tuesday said he was “confident” changes to the National Security Agency's bulk collection of phone metadata would both address privacy concerns and keep the nation safe from terror attacks. “Overall, I'm confident that it allows us to do what is necessary in order to...

  • Report: Obama to call for ending NSA storage of phone metadata

    President Obama is preparing to unveil a proposal to end the National Security Agency's collection and storage of bulk phone metadata, according to a report.

  • Whispers, secrets and lies? Anonymity apps rise

    NEW YORK (AP) — At a time when Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are pushing people to put forward their most polished, put-together selves, a new class of mobile applications aims for a bit more honesty. Among the latest is Secret, created by two former Google engineers who were looking for a...

  • Police keep quiet about cell-tracking technology

    Police across the country may be intercepting phone calls or text messages to find suspects using a technology tool known as Stingray. But they're refusing to turn over details about its use or heavily censoring files when they do.

  • Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg to attend White House meeting with tech CEOs

    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will be one of the tech industry leaders meeting with President Obama at the White House on Friday. Obama is hosting Silicon Valley executives to “continue his dialogue with them on privacy, technology and intelligence,” White House press secretary Jay Carney...

  • Judge extends order blocking data destruction

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal judge in San Francisco has extended his nationwide order blocking the National Security Agency from destroying telephone surveillance records. U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White issued a restraining order on March 10 to prevent the National Security Agency from...

  • IRS: Worker took home personal info on 20K workers

    An IRS employee took home personal information on about 20,000 IRS workers, former workers and contractors, putting the data at risk for public release, the agency said Tuesday. The employee took home a computer thumb drive containing names, Social Security numbers and addresses of the...

  • Police officers' body cameras raise privacy concerns

    Officers at thousands of law enforcement agencies are wearing tiny cameras to record their interactions with the public, but in many cases the devices are being rolled out faster than departments are able to create policies to govern their use.

  • The security vs. privacy debate is already over, and privacy lost

    When Edward Snowden leaked massive troves of information about the National Security Agency's collection of electronic information, he started a debate over the tradeoffs between security and privacy. At least that's how President Obama framed it, arguing, “we have to make some important...



From the Weekly Standard