More Supreme Court Articles

  • A supreme need for educational diversity

    In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ended legal segregation in public schools with a unanimous 9-0 decision in Brown v. Board of Education. While the ruling paved the way for future integration of American society, the court itself was far from integrated. The decision was reached by nine white men....

  • What affirmative action hides

    Sonia Sotomayor is a wonderful role model. Truly. Through hard work, brains and rare self-discipline at an early age, she was able to overcome poverty and family dysfunction to become what she is today.

  • High court stops short of ending racial quotas and preferences

    Schuette v. BAMN shouldn't have been a hard case. The Fourteenth Amendment outlaws racial discrimination. Racial quotas and preferences are, by definition, racial discrimination. Fifty-eight percent of Michigan voters in 2006 voted to prohibit racial quotas and preferences in admission to...

  • Editorial cartoon: Affirmative action

    Cartoon by Nate Beeler/Cagle cartoons.

  • High court nixes $3.4M award to child porn victim

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a plea to make it easier for victims of child pornography to collect money from people who view their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the...

  • Democracy, the Supreme Court and affirmative action

    The question of racial preferences in university admissions has bedeviled the nation for decades. In 2003, the Supreme Court finally issued a verdict that gave something to either side of the debate.

  • Supreme Court sets limits on child porn restitution

    The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that viewers of child pornography are liable to pay for victims pain and suffering, but set limits on the size of the restitution. In the process, the justices in a 5-4 decision threw out an almost $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape...

  • Sonia Sotomayor: Don't trust the media to tell you what the Supreme Court decided

    When six Supreme Court justices on Tuesday upheld Michigan's ban on race-based affirmative action in state college admissions, the decision provoked consternation from all the predictable characters, so it may be a good time to consider Justice Sonia Sotomayor's advice on how to think about the...

  • John Paul Stevens' 'Six Amendments' shows why elections matter

    Honestly, unless you are a big government liberal, how many people think the federal government should have more power than it already exercises over its citizens?

  • Court won't overturn death sentence for Ky. man

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday declined to overturn the death sentence of a man who confessed to kidnapping, raping and killing a 16-year-old girl in Kentucky. The justices ruled 6-3 that Robert Keith Woodall was not entitled to a new sentencing hearing despite his claim...

  • Internet TV case: Justices skeptical, concerned

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Grappling with fast-changing technology, Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in the use of the internet. The high court heard arguments in a dispute...

  • Supreme Court raises concerns over Ohio law that punishes campaign lies

    The Supreme Court appeared doubtful of the constitutionality of an Ohio law aimed at stopping false accusations made against political candidates during campaigns. During oral arguments Tuesday on a key free speech case, most justices seemed willing to allow anti-abortion group Susan B....

  • Court critical of Ohio law punishing campaign lies

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court appears to be highly skeptical of laws that try to police false statements during political campaigns, raising doubts about the viability of such laws in more than 15 states. Justices expressed those concerns early and often Tuesday during arguments in a...

  • Jay Carney reaffirms Obama's support for diverse classrooms after affirmative-action ruling

    President Obama did not have an immediate and direct reaction to Tuesday's Supreme Court ruling upholding Michigan's ban on using race as a factor in college admissions. Instead, White House press secretary Jay Carney reaffirmed the president's support for creating a diverse classroom...

  • Michigan affirmative ban is OK, Supreme Court says

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A state's voters are free to outlaw the use of race as a factor in college admissions, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a blow to affirmative action that also laid bare tensions among the justices about a continuing need for programs that address racial inequality in...



From the Weekly Standard

  • The Closing of the Academic Mind

    From Brandeis on the Atlantic to Azusa on the Pacific, an iron curtain has descended across academia. Behind that line lie all the classrooms of the ancient schools of America. Wesleyan, Brown,...

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  • Why Not an Open Convention?

    When the Republican National Committee adopted a new primary calendar in January, few people fully thought through the impact. Successfully and necessarily fighting the last war, Chairman Reince...

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  • NATO Is Still the Answer

    The continuing Ukraine crisis raises both a critical “what if?” question and a pressing policy issue. What if, in April 2008, the Europeans had not rejected President Bush’s proposal to...

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