More Supreme Court Articles

  • The Supreme Court campaign finance decision for dummies

    On Wednesday, the Supreme Court released another ruling on campaign donations. Naturally, those who fundraise off the idea that donating to campaigns equals more free speech for the wealthy were apoplectic.

  • Supreme Court voids overall contribution limits

    The Supreme Court has struck down limits in federal law on the overall campaign contributions the biggest individual donors may make to candidates, political parties and political action committees.

  • How the coercion coalition is imposing the new 'freedom' in America

    Oral arguments at the Supreme Court on Tuesday in the Conestoga Wood Specialties and Hobby Lobby case showed bureaucrats and special interest groups led by the abortion lobby are willing to coerce you to participate in anything they say is a “right,” especially abortion. The government's...

  • Trial lawyers helped FDA with rule opening generic drug firms to lawsuits

    The association that represents America's trial lawyers played a special role in the Food and Drug Administration's process of developing a new rule that opens the door to suits against generic drug makers, a potential financial bonanza to lawyers -- and a $4 billion hit to consumers and the...

  • How Hobby Lobby's Obamacare birth control case will hurt conservatives

    Lawyers for Hobby Lobby this week urged the Supreme Court to let companies opt out of certain health insurance rules for religious reasons, and they have a good chance of success. If employers are allowed to refuse to provide coverage that pays for certain types of contraception, it will be a big...

  • With Obamacare, Caesar strays over the church-state line

    “Well, then,” Jesus said, “give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God.” (Mark 12:17 Living Paraphrase) When considering what belongs to Caesar and what belongs to God, what happens when the federal government seeks to replace God by defining “church”...

  • Supreme Court seems likely to block Secret Service case

    The Supreme Court appeared likely Wednesday to block a group of protesters from bringing free-speech claims against two Secret Service agents who were guarding President George W. Bush during a 2004 visit to Oregon. Several justices said there was not enough evidence that the agents violated...

  • Mike Lee: It's possible Supreme Court rules 7-2 in favor of Hobby Lobby

    Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, said Tuesday evening he was optimistic the Supreme Court would rule in favor of Hobby Lobby, suggesting that the case might even be more lopsided than the usual 5-4 ruling. "All of those justices can see the obvious implications for religious freedom here, and I think...

  • Supreme Court justices appear divided on Obamacare-Hobby Lobby case

    The Supreme Court appeared divided Tuesday on a potentially landmark case addressing whether businesses can opt out of a key Obamacare provision on religious grounds. The case centers on whether businesses have religious rights, as two for-profit corporations are contesting an Affordable Care...

  • Birth control rule seems to divide Supreme Court

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Seemingly divided, the Supreme Court struggled Tuesday with the question of whether companies have religious rights, a case challenging President Barack Obama's health overhaul and its guarantee of birth control in employees' preventive care plans. Peppering attorneys with...

  • Sen. Ted Cruz rallies religious freedom activists at the Supreme Court in support of Hobby Lobby

    Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, surprised freezing religious freedom activists who had spent the morning rallying in support of Hobby Lobby's Supreme Court appeal. "God bless you for being here today!" Cruz said Tuesday, after wading into the crowd and stepping up to the podium. Activists cheered...

  • Activists duel as Hobby Lobby case reaches the Supreme Court

    Activists dueled in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday as the oral arguments began in the Hobby Lobby case in the middle of a rare spring snowfall in Washington. "Let it snow, we won't go! Bosses in the bedroom have to go!" shouted activists from Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice...

  • Supreme Court says regulatory law means whatever EPA says it means, today

    Ever heard of the U.S. Supreme Court's Plessy v Ferguson ruling in 1896? That's the one where the guys in the black robes upheld "separate but equal" *accommodations on public facilities like trains. Or how about the Dred Scott case in 1857? Most Americans have probably heard of that one...

  • Health law birth control coverage before justices

    The Obama administration and its opponents are renewing the Supreme Court battle over President Obama's health care law in a case that pits the religious rights of employers against the rights of women to the birth control of their choice.

  • Supreme Court set to hear Obamacare contraception case

    The Supreme Court is set to address whether businesses can opt out of Obamacare because of religious objections, in a new challenge that addresses the constitutionality of the president's health care law. The case also amps up the debate of whether corporations are "people" with the same...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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