More Supreme Court Articles

  • Court: Religious rights trump birth control rule

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under...

  • Wendy Davis misses the mark on Hobby Lobby decision

    Wendy Davis, the Fort Worth lawyer and Texas state senator running for governor, tried to capitalize on the Supreme Court's decision in the Hobby Lobby case Monday, but she just couldn't get the message right.

  • Opponents of Minnesota union drives hail ruling

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Bolstered by a U.S. Supreme Court ruling Monday that limits organized labor's power to collect compulsory dues, the lead plaintiff in a parallel Minnesota lawsuit urged Gov. Mark Dayton to have state lawyers stand down and ultimately cancel a pair of drives to unionize...

  • Deconstructing the White House's childish response to the Hobby Lobby decision

    White House press secretary Josh Earnest said Monday that the Supreme Court's decision in favor of the Hobby Lobby's religious freedom "jeopardizes the health of women."

  • Good news for liberty in Hobby Lobby dissent

    Though they joined colleague Ruth Bader Ginsburg in arguing against Hobby Lobby's challenge to the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate, Supreme Court Justices Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan filed a separate one-paragraph dissent that bodes well for the future of religious liberty.

  • Monday meme: Hobby Lobby dissidence

  • Supreme Court kills Obamacare birth control mandate in Hobby Lobby case

    The Supreme Court struck down a key Obamacare provision Monday, saying businesses can use religious beliefs to opt out of a requirement that employers cover birth control for employees.

  • VIDEO: Supreme Court rules 5-4 in favor of Hobby Lobby

    The Supreme Court ruled Monday in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that employers with religious objections can opt out of providing certain contraceptive coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

  • VIDEO --- WEX BackStory: What's next after Hobby Lobby?

    In its latest ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday employers should not be required under the Affordable Care Act to offer contraception if it conflicts with the company's religious views.

  • White House: Supreme Court contraception ruling jeopardizes women's health

    The White House on Monday slammed the Supreme Court's ruling that certain businesses can opt out of Obamacare's contraception mandate, saying Congress should act to ensure that women at closely-held corporations have access to birth control.

  • Illinois unions object to Supreme Court ruling

    CHICAGO (AP) — A union representing Illinois home care workers is criticizing a Supreme Court ruling that found workers cannot be required to pay fees to help cover collective bargaining. Flora Johnson is a home care provider from Chicago and chair of the Executive Board of Service Employees...

  • Supreme Court takes straightest path to overturning contraception mandate

    The opinion didn't establish any broad new Constitutional principles, but rather ruled that the contraception mandate violated the Religious Freedom and Restoration Act.

  • Nicaraguan on Texas death row loses at high court

    HOUSTON (AP) — A Nicaraguan man sent to Texas death row for fatally shooting a customer during a robbery at a Houston-area dry cleaning store has lost a U.S. Supreme Court appeal that contended he was under 18 at the time of the slaying, making him ineligible for the death penalty. Prison...

  • US Supreme Court lets Equifax tax ruling stand

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that it won't hear an appeal from credit bureau Equifax Inc. involving what it considered an adverse tax ruling in Mississippi. The appeal was a reaction to a 2013 Mississippi Supreme Court decision that Equifax had to prove that it...

  • Obama likes secrets --- including yours

    The surprising thing about the Supreme Court's decision on police searches of cellphones was its unanimity. Aligned on the same side of a major law enforcement issue were liberal and conservative justices who normally fight like cats and dogs. All agreed that it's intolerable to let cops ransack...



From the Weekly Standard