More Surveillance Articles

  • UN: Nations hide rise in private digital snooping

    GENEVA (AP) — Governments on every continent are hiding an increasing reliance on private companies to snoop on citizens' digital lives, the U.N. human rights office said Wednesday. Stepping into a fierce debate over digital privacy rights, the U.N. office says it has strong evidence of a...

  • Merkel doubtful US will stop spying on Germany

    BERLIN (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel is doubtful the U.S. will stop spying on Germany. The chancellor said in an interview with public broadcaster ZDF "I think it's not that easy to convince the Americans ... to completely change the way their intelligence services work." Germany on...

  • Advisor: Obama, NSA use Internet to silence critics like Tea Party

    The administration is targeting critics online with an even more aggressive campaign than J. Edgar Hoover used against his enemies, says a prominent financial advisor.

  • UK govt seeks data retention law after EU verdict

    LONDON (AP) — Concerned after a European court ruled in favor of citizens' right to privacy, Britain's prime minister pledged Thursday to rush through emergency measures to force phone and Internet companies to store call and search records for a year. The European Court of Justice ruled in...

  • German leader: US spy reports serious if true

    BEIJING (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Monday that if reports that a German intelligence employee spied for the United States are proven true, it would be a "clear contradiction" of trust between the allies. Speaking at a news conference in China, Merkel made her first public...

  • UK PM's ex-aide Coulson facing perjury charge

    LONDON (AP) — Scottish prosecutors say former News of the World editor Andy Coulson, convicted last month of phone hacking, has been summoned to face a perjury charge. Prosecutors say Coulson was served with an indictment Monday telling him to appear in a Glasgow court on Aug. 6. He is...

  • Merkel slams industrial spying on China visit

    BEIJING (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel criticized industrial spying Monday while on a visit to China, which Germany and other governments have cited as a global center for economic espionage. Merkel did not single out China in her comments, which came during a news conference with...

  • Germany summons US envoy over spy case

    BERLIN (AP) — Germany summoned the U.S. ambassador in Berlin on Friday following the arrest of a man reported to have spied for the United States, heightening friction between the two countries over alleged U.S. eavesdropping in Germany. U.S. Ambassador John B. Emerson was called in "in...

  • Report: NSA targeted German privacy activist

    BERLIN (AP) — German media reported Thursday that users and supporters of a popular online anonymity tool are among those automatically singled out for special attention by U.S. security services. The report by public broadcasters WDR and NDR says the code from the National Security Agency's...

  • A thumbs-up for NSA Internet spying on foreigners

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Endorsement of the NSA's Internet surveillance programs by a bipartisan privacy board deeply disappointed civil liberties activists Wednesday while providing a measure of vindication for beleaguered U.S. intelligence officials. James Clapper, director of national...

  • India complains to US about alleged surveillance

    NEW DELHI (AP) — India summoned senior U.S. diplomats on Wednesday and lodged an official complaint over reports that the U.S. National Security Agency snooped on new Prime Minister Narendra Modi's political party in 2010. External Affairs Ministry spokesman Syed Akbaruddin said that, if...

  • Often-split court agrees your privacy matters

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court justices found more common ground than usual this year, and nowhere was their unanimity more surprising than in a ruling that police must get a judge's approval before searching the cellphones of people they've arrested. The term that just ended also had its...

  • Obama likes secrets --- including yours

    The surprising thing about the Supreme Court's decision on police searches of cellphones was its unanimity. Aligned on the same side of a major law enforcement issue were liberal and conservative justices who normally fight like cats and dogs. All agreed that it's intolerable to let cops ransack...

  • NSA fears prompt Germany to end Verizon contract

    BERLIN (AP) — The German government is ending a contract with Verizon over fears the company could be letting U.S. intelligence agencies eavesdrop on sensitive communications, officials said Thursday. The New York-based company has for years provided Internet services to a number of...

  • Supreme Court's decision on mobile phones could affect NSA surveillance

    The Supreme Court's sweeping endorsement of digital privacy could have wider implications for the National Security Agency's collection of phone records.



From the Weekly Standard

  • For GOP, a Good Crop of Senate Candidates

    Republicans have distinct advantages in Senate races this year, including President Obama’s low job ratings, the number of vulnerable Democrats, and an unhappy national mood. But there’s...

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  • How to Play a Weak Hand in Iraq

    Iraqi prime minister Nuri al-Maliki knows what he wants: a third term in office for himself and U.S. military help in defeating ISIS (now the Islamic State). Political reconciliation between...

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  • The Ethics of Food and Drink

    Should the law compel nursing homes to starve certain Alzheimer’s patients to death? This is not an alarmist fantasy, but a real question, soon to be forced by advocates of ever-wider...

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