More Watchdog Articles

  • Citigroup to pay $7B in subprime mortgages probe

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Citigroup has agreed to pay $7 billion to settle a federal investigation into its handling of risky subprime mortgages, admitting to a pattern of deception that Attorney General Eric Holder said "shattered lives" and contributed to the worst financial crisis in decades, the...

  • Haslam-owned truck-stop chain to pay $92M fine

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The truck-stop company owned by Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has agreed to pay a $92 million penalty for cheating customers out of promised rebates and discounts, authorities announced Monday. In an agreement with the U.S....

  • Fast tracking claims helped Veterans Affairs backlog stats but hurt disabled vets, inspector general finds

    Fast-tracking the oldest claims for disability benefits at the Department of Veterans Affairs forced veterans to wait longer to resolve their cases, but falsely made the agency's statistics look better, the VA's inspector general said in a report issued Monday.

  • Ernst & Young paying $4M to settle SEC charges

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Ernst & Young has agreed to pay $4 million to settle civil charges of compromising its independence by lobbying Congress on behalf of two companies whose books it audited. The Securities and Exchange Commission announced the settlement Monday with New York-based company, one...

  • Illinois AG sues, alleging student loan debt scams

    CHICAGO (AP) — Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan filed lawsuits Monday against two companies she says are scamming people who are paying student loan debts. The lawsuits, filed in Cook and Champaign counties, alleged "deceptive practices" for charging up-front fees for phony services or...

  • Another federal judge orders IRS to produce signed affidavits explaining its actions in targeting scandal

    U.S. District Court Judge Reggie Walton has given IRS officials only five workdays to produce a signed affidavit explaining why Lois Lerner's computer hard drive "cannot be identified and preserved."

  • This Energy Department blunder cost taxpayers at least $56 million

    The U.S. Department of Energy has lost more than $56 million due to poor coordination during implementation of a new telephone system, according to the DoE inspector general.

  • HUD program, meant to help, actually hurts, IG reports

    A $353 million effort to help federal officials better manage public housing assistance instead "created further opportunity for fraud, waste, and abuse of taxpayer dollars," according to a government watchdog. Created in 2007, the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Public Housing...

  • Guess what this 'federal employee of the year' was doing with mail

    Pills, jewelry, copies of Playboy magazine and passports were stolen by Quan Howard, a Postal Service supervisory postal inspector once named federal employee of the year for the San Francisco Bay area, court records analyzed by the San Francisco Chronicle show.

  • Chicago police to make misconduct files public

    CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago police misconduct investigation files will be made available to the public, after city attorneys decided not to continue fighting litigation pursuing their release, Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office said Sunday. The city previously had a long-standing policy of treating...

  • Chicago taxpayers paying for millions in 'free' trash pickup

    Thousands of nonprofit groups and small apartment buildings have been getting free city garbage service for the past decade when they shouldn't have been, according to a new Chicago inspector general's report and reporting by the Chicago Sun-Times.

  • Another Chris Christie aide to testify on lane shutdown

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — One of Gov. Chris Christie's top aides is scheduled to answer questions this week from lawmakers who are investigating traffic jams last year near the George Washington Bridge even as Christie tries to put any hint of scandal behind him. Regina Egea is to appear Thursday...

  • Veterans Affairs officials claim agency cannot revoke bonuses, contradicting earlier statements to congressional committee

    Bonuses paid to top executives at the Department of Veterans Affairs who committed misconduct cannot be rescinded, an agency official testified Friday, in direct contradiction to what he told a different panel less than a month ago.

  • NHTSA probes 500K Ford cars for steering issues

    NEW YORK (AP) — The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says it is investigating steering problems in about 500,000 Ford cars. The investigation covers 2004 to 2007 Crown Victoria, Grand Marquis and Marauder models. NHTSA says a heat shield in the car can rust, dislodge and cause...

  • The man picked to clean up Veterans Affairs' scandals

    Cleaning up the scandal-ridden Department of Veterans Affairs will be the mission of Robert McDonald, an outsider and former Army Ranger with decades of high-level management experience in the private sector.



From the Weekly Standard

  • For GOP, a Good Crop of Senate Candidates

    Republicans have distinct advantages in Senate races this year, including President Obama’s low job ratings, the number of vulnerable Democrats, and an unhappy national mood. But there’s...

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  • How to Play a Weak Hand in Iraq

    Iraqi prime minister Nuri al-Maliki knows what he wants: a third term in office for himself and U.S. military help in defeating ISIS (now the Islamic State). Political reconciliation between...

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  • The Ethics of Food and Drink

    Should the law compel nursing homes to starve certain Alzheimer’s patients to death? This is not an alarmist fantasy, but a real question, soon to be forced by advocates of ever-wider...

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