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Senators press for more sanctions on Russia

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Photo - Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland, center, is flanked by Assistant Secretary of Defense Derek Chollet, left, and Assistant Treasury Secretary Daniel Glaser, right, as she testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 9, 2014, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing to examine Russia and developments in Ukraine,  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland, center, is flanked by Assistant Secretary of Defense Derek Chollet, left, and Assistant Treasury Secretary Daniel Glaser, right, as she testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 9, 2014, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing to examine Russia and developments in Ukraine, (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic and Republican senators exasperated with the Obama administration's response to Russia's aggression in Ukraine threatened on Wednesday that Congress will act unilaterally on new sanctions.

"What are we waiting for?" Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, asked twice at a hearing with senior administration officials from State, Treasury and the Defense departments about targeted sanctions that the administration said it was preparing last month.

Lawmakers ticked off a list of examples of Russia's pattern of escalating the nearly three month crisis and then pulling back, arguing that Russian President Vladimir Putin has made the U.S. and European allies look foolish. More than 400 people have died and thousands have fled their homes in Ukraine as fighting continues between government forces and pro-Russia separatists.

Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, the top Republican on the committee, called the administration's sanctions policy "feckless" and described the U.S. as a "paper tiger to the world."

Victoria Nuland, the assistant secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs, defended the administration's policies, saying the United States is ready to impose new sanctions "very soon." She stressed that it would be more effective for the United States to work together with Europe on such steps and the U.S. continues to consult with its allies. However, she said Obama has made clear that if necessary, the U.S. would act alone.

Menendez said he didn't know how long Congress would wait before moving independently. He listed the benchmarks set by Obama and allies last month for a new round of sanctions, including an end to Russian help to the separatists, release of hostages and significant negotiations on Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko's peace plan.

Menendez said he has seen no progress on those steps and pressed the administration to act.

Nuland concurred with Menendez's assessment and said the administration is continuing to prepare new sanctions.

Corker questioned what was behind the administration's reluctance. He asked whether it was fear of economic blowback that could cost Democrats in November's midterm elections or related to Europe's concerns given its reliance on Russia for fuel supplies.

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