Talking Points: Six-legged livestock, sick sea turtles, space mice

|
Local,Science and Technology,Talking Points,Animals

What new solution is being proposed to end world hunger?

Eat bugs. Not only eat bugs but farm bugs -- farm them like chicken or salmon. Researchers in Thailand say that raising "six-legged livestock" would help the world meet global demand for food that is expected to grow 60 percent by 2050. The scuttling morsels are described as providing a rich source of protein, vitamins and minerals. Entomologist Yupa Hanboonsong says about 200 insect species are eaten in Thailand. Cricket farming alone is already a $30 million industry there, but only a few other species have been commercially marketed.

How are sick sea turtles being treated for hypothermia?

The turtles are seeing an acupuncturist who is helping them regain the use of their limbs after they got stranded on Cape Cod during a cold spell. The endangered sea turtles were malnourished. Hypothermia set in and rendered the cold-blooded animals immobile and unable to eat for days. The acupuncture is intended to reduce stress, increase blood flow and boost the immune system -- just as in humans. "We are seeing improved limb use and improved appetite," said Connie Merigo, head of the aquarium's marine rescue team. "They are eating on their own, which is fantastic."

What was special about the mice returning from space this week?

Well, for starters, how many animals get to fly in space? Having said that, they were also in space for a month -- the first time animals have flown in space for so long on their own. The troop of critters also included lizards, small crayfish and fish. They were to be flown back to Moscow to undergo a series of tests at Sychov's institute, which is part of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

View article comments Leave a comment
Author:

By the staff of
The Washington Examiner