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UN doubts legality of Israeli air campaign

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Photo - Palestinians inspect the rubble of a building after it was hit by an Israeli missile strike in Gaza City, Friday, July 11, 2014. Israel launched the Gaza offensive to stop incessant rocket fire that erupted after three Israeli teenagers were kidnapped and killed in the West Bank and a Palestinian teenager was abducted and burned to death in an apparent reprisal attack. The military says it has hit more than 1,100 targets already, mostly what it identified as rocket-launching sites, bombarding the territory on average every five minutes.(AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)
Palestinians inspect the rubble of a building after it was hit by an Israeli missile strike in Gaza City, Friday, July 11, 2014. Israel launched the Gaza offensive to stop incessant rocket fire that erupted after three Israeli teenagers were kidnapped and killed in the West Bank and a Palestinian teenager was abducted and burned to death in an apparent reprisal attack. The military says it has hit more than 1,100 targets already, mostly what it identified as rocket-launching sites, bombarding the territory on average every five minutes.(AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)
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GENEVA (AP) — The U.N.'s top human rights official says she is alarmed that Israel's air campaign in Gaza may violate international laws prohibiting the targeting of civilians.

Navi Pillay says the Israeli military, which claims to have hit more than 1,100 targets that it says are mostly rocket-launching sites, and the Gaza militants, who have fired more than 550 rockets against Israel, must abide by international law.

Pillay said in a statement Friday she has "serious doubt about whether the Israeli strikes have been in accordance with international humanitarian law and international human rights law."

She says "civilians are bearing the brunt of the conflict" between Israel, Hamas and Palestinian armed groups in Gaza and called on all sides to refrain from launching attacks or putting military weapons in densely populated areas.

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