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What we learned in the Redskins' loss to the Giants

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Sports,NFL,Redskins,John Keim

1. Tight end Logan Paulsen is one of the most improved players on the team. Last season Paulsen was capable of good series and even good quarters, but he wasn't consistent. However, Paulsen's good blocks and plays far outweigh his bad. He's not a budding star, but he is a good player, especially in a secondary role. The good thing about this offense is that even Fred Davis at times got lost by the defense because of all the confusion the Redskins create. So the tight ends still can be involved in the passing attack and make plays downfield as Paulsen did Sunday vs. New York. As a blocker, he's much more consistent getting his feet around and sealing ends.

2. Any legitimate solutions to the issues in the secondary won't occur until the offseason. But the Redskins will have other problems, a small amount of cap space and one fewer draft pick. So they will have to be smarter than this past offseason, when one solution as a starting free safety was a player who had multiple drug suspensions -- and then was suspended for drug use. Free safety Madieu Williams will not get faster. DeAngelo Hall can line up at safety on occasion, but that does not make him one -- it takes time to learn angles at that spot. This area was a concern entering the season and will be at or near the top of the list when the year is over. This should not come as a surprise to anyone. This group, though, has been the most stand-up of any unit on the team. That doesn't solve the problem, but it is not hiding from criticism.

3. With Fred Davis out for the season and Pierre Garcon out for probably a few more weeks, the Redskins' offense won't have a lot of speed save for quarterback Robert Griffin III. Receiver Leonard Hankerson has good speed as does Santana Moss, so that helps. Aldrick Robinson hasn't played a lot lately. But Davis was fast for his position, and Garcon obviously is as well. Does this mean the explosive plays won't continue? Probably not because, again, of the offensive confusion that is created. However, it bears watching.

jkeim@washingtonexaminer.com

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